Beauty, Carbohydrates, carotene, Carrots, edamame, Fats, fiber, Health, hummus, magnesium, potassium, sixpence recipes, soups, Uncategorized, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, vitamin C, Vitamin K, Well being

What is in Brussels sprouts?

Along with brocolli, kale, cabage, and collard greens, Brussels sprouts are a member of the Brassicaceae family. Usually steamed, boiled, or even fried for consumption, brussels sprouts are commonly associated with that very specific, powerful smell that can take over your kitchen and give your children an extra argument to run and hide at the prospect of dinner.

Fortunately, there is much more to the smelly offenders than just the notorious aroma. Brussels sprouts contain huge amounts of vitamins K, C, and A, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus, B vitamins, fiber, and a decent amount of carbohydrates. They are now well known for their anti-carcinogenic properties, although some of those are lost during exposure to high temperatures.

Today, I am mixing brussels sprouts with broccoli, red potatoes, and carrots, for a vitamin, fiber, and carb-dense and very delicious smelly cream soup.

I used:

1 lbs of brussels sprouts;

3 large red potatoes;

1 large stem of broccoli;

4 carrots;

salt and pepper;

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil;

a tiny bit of rosemary;

1/3 cup of almond milk.

Simply boil the veggies until soft, place them in a blender with the rest of the ingredients, and blend until you reach a creamy, thick consistency. Very very easy, very delicious, very wholesome. It’s good to be vegan. Enjoy! I did–with some edamame hummus ¬†and crackers on the side –a great source of protein :). After swimming and lifting some weights, this is amazing recovery food.

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Beauty, Carbohydrates, edamame, Fats, fiber, Health, hummus, sixpence recipes, Super foods, Uncategorized, vitamin C

Edamame, roasted red pepper, and olives hummus

Today I had a fantastic strength training work out, which had been long overdue. After I caught up with the smith machine, a high-protein, high-varb treat was in order.

For this one, be sure to have the right food processor, and switch settings as needed so as not to overheat the motor for the blades. My blender found the making of this hummus a tad too difficult.

you need:

4 cups of edamame, roasted

5-6 cups of chickpeas (I prepared enough hummus to last me for several days)

3 tbsp of garlic

the juice from 2-3 limes

1 cup of kalamata olives

2 roasted red peppers

salt

olive oil

This amazing little treat has over 70 g of protein, is carbohydrate and fiber-rich, and ensures a healthy amount of Vitamin C! Enjoy it. Very filling and delicious.

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Beauty, Carbohydrates, carotene, Fats, fiber, Health, potassium, Science-based nutrition, sixpence recipes, Uncategorized, Vitamin A, vitamin C, Well being

What’s for dinner?

Tonight I feast on iron, beta-carotene, Niacin, Vitamins A, B5, B6, B9, C, E, K, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, lycopene–a phytochemical (and a carotenoid pigment), and essential nutrient, and an antioxidant (just like the also available through peppers to me tonight p-coumaric acid), plant fats, and of course fiber and carbohydrates. Fantastic anti-carcinogenic properties, and a perfect recovery meal after running, weight lifting, and a morning hike.

I used:

1 green bell pepper

1/3 cup red onion, chopped

1 1/5 tbsp of garlic, minced

3 cups of kale

3 cups of spinach

1 large tomato

1/2 squash

1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

sea salt

Once again: nothing to it–chop up the veggies, place them in a pan with a tiny bit of olive oil, and let them simmer for 15-20 minutes. Such a flavorful and wholesomely nutritious dinner. Enjoy!

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Beauty, Fats, Health, Science-based nutrition, Uncategorized, Well being

Harvard on common misconceptions about fats

It always strikes me as nonsensical that simply labeling a food item as “fat free” or “low fat” immediately links that item with an idea of health, diet, and weight loss. Of course, the notion of reducing fat intake as a means of reducing body fat has the appeal of sounding logical and straightforward. But is it?

Imagine I gave you a pack of sugar. Fats? None. Fat-free? Absolutely. Healthy? Conducive to a decrease in weight? Certainly not. And here comes my first point: most low fat and fat free products are very high in sugars/carbohydrates. Imagine what happens to a “dieter” who commits to a low fat diet, without regard for other nutrients…almost certainly this will be a dieting disaster, and a very unhealthy one.

But there is an additional problem (my second point), that has to do with understanding fats with more specificity: not all fats are created equal, and drastically reducing plant-based fats in your diet can in fact be dangerous.

The Harvard School of Public Health offers an in-depth and accessible overview of the aforementioned concerns, and goes deeper. Check it out here, be sure to substitute animal fats with oils derived from plants, and, most importantly, GO VEGAN!

http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/fats-full-story/

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