Amino acids, Beauty, Carbohydrates, drinks, fiber, Health, potassium, Raw, Smoothies, Uncategorized

Drinks, anyone? :)

One aspect of raw veganism that I especially like is the beauty of just about anything you can prepare. And it’s not enough that blending all the gorgeous natural colors and flavors of fruits, vegetables, seeds, and nuts gives you delicious medley of aroma and texture; in those colors live unaltered nutrients ready to fuel a healthy, fit, happy lifestyle.

And on this Friday night, I thought what better thing to do than share some of this beauty in the festive mood of the upcoming weekend.

Just to boost the joyous spirit a bit, I offer you a shot. Greenish, sweet, very aromatic, rich in vitamins C, A, K, as well as iron, water, fiber, and some carbohydrates. For this beauty, take about 3 cups of kale, 1 large kiwi, and a large slice of water melon. Add some mint for even more flavor and…enjoy!

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If, however, you are in the mood for a more girly kind of drink, I think a pinkish, sweet, rich cocktail just might do the trick.

This cocktail is bursting with vitamin A, amino acids, and antioxidants, is quite fruity, with a hint of fresh lime.

Blend together a mixture of cherries, raspberries, blackberries, strawberries and blueberries.

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Add a cup of chopped up mango, a cup of almond milk, a little bit of kale, and the juice from one fresh lime.

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The perfect refreshing deliciousness in PINK!

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Finally, one of my favorites–quite the filling, potassium and fiber – rich, creamy treat. Add one banana to 4-5 cups of kale, 1/2 cup of ground almonds, a pinch of flaxseed, 1 cup of almond milk, and 1 cup of spinach. I would have this nutritious smoothie before, as well as after a strength work out any day.

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I hope you are enjoying a lovely Friday night and looking forward to a great weekend. Cheers!

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Food labels, Health, Science-based nutrition, Uncategorized, Well being

Nutrition and child brain function: why rave about simple, raw foods

An illuminating and rich read on the impact of improper nutrition on child behavioral and psychiatric health. A young mother recently told me that her son’s friend, still in middle school, eats a bag of skittles and a diet coke for lunch–packed by his parents.

It’s critical to know what goes into our bodies and in the bodies of our loved ones; pharmacology alone is not a proper response to the multitude of symptoms children are being diagnosed with.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22928358

a propos of dyes, artificial additives, and killer lunches, here’s Skittles:

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http://www.dyediet.com/2011/06/12/candy-and-snacks/skittles-taste-the-rainbow-of-dyes/

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Beauty, Carbohydrates, carotene, Carrots, edamame, Fats, fiber, Health, hummus, magnesium, potassium, sixpence recipes, soups, Uncategorized, Vitamin A, Vitamin B, vitamin C, Vitamin K, Well being

What is in Brussels sprouts?

Along with brocolli, kale, cabage, and collard greens, Brussels sprouts are a member of the Brassicaceae family. Usually steamed, boiled, or even fried for consumption, brussels sprouts are commonly associated with that very specific, powerful smell that can take over your kitchen and give your children an extra argument to run and hide at the prospect of dinner.

Fortunately, there is much more to the smelly offenders than just the notorious aroma. Brussels sprouts contain huge amounts of vitamins K, C, and A, calcium, magnesium, potassium, and phosphorus, B vitamins, fiber, and a decent amount of carbohydrates. They are now well known for their anti-carcinogenic properties, although some of those are lost during exposure to high temperatures.

Today, I am mixing brussels sprouts with broccoli, red potatoes, and carrots, for a vitamin, fiber, and carb-dense and very delicious smelly cream soup.

I used:

1 lbs of brussels sprouts;

3 large red potatoes;

1 large stem of broccoli;

4 carrots;

salt and pepper;

2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil;

a tiny bit of rosemary;

1/3 cup of almond milk.

Simply boil the veggies until soft, place them in a blender with the rest of the ingredients, and blend until you reach a creamy, thick consistency. Very very easy, very delicious, very wholesome. It’s good to be vegan. Enjoy! I did–with some edamame hummus  and crackers on the side –a great source of protein :). After swimming and lifting some weights, this is amazing recovery food.

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Amino acids, Beauty, Health, Science-based nutrition, Super foods, Uncategorized

On complete protein: food combinations, essential amino acids, and vegan sources

I have emphasized here the importance of understanding the specific nutritional benefits as well as limitations of a vegan diet. In 9/10 cases, we vegans get asked about protein consumption and supplementation. Although the majority of these questions target the apparently drastic decision to remove animal products from our diets, such as the commonly thought of as primary protein sources milk, cheese, and meat, some of these inquiries relay a better informed nutritional concern: what protein do we get?

Common vegan sources of protein are likely well known to all vegans. Some leafy greens, beans and nuts, are a regular component of most vegan diets. But the regular intake of protein-rich foods is not a sufficient condition to ensure adequate protein intake.

I’ve said this about fats, and it’s valid for protein: not all protein is created equal. Guaranteeing complete protein availability through food requires some combinatorial skills.

The links below outline, for vegans and vegetarians alike, complementary sources of different types of proteins. Be sure to combine protein-rich foods to supply your body with the full range of micro nutrients.

http://www.vrg.org/nutrition/protein.php

http://www.four-h.purdue.edu/foods/Vegetarians.htm

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Beauty, Carbohydrates, edamame, Fats, fiber, Health, hummus, sixpence recipes, Super foods, Uncategorized, vitamin C

Edamame, roasted red pepper, and olives hummus

Today I had a fantastic strength training work out, which had been long overdue. After I caught up with the smith machine, a high-protein, high-varb treat was in order.

For this one, be sure to have the right food processor, and switch settings as needed so as not to overheat the motor for the blades. My blender found the making of this hummus a tad too difficult.

you need:

4 cups of edamame, roasted

5-6 cups of chickpeas (I prepared enough hummus to last me for several days)

3 tbsp of garlic

the juice from 2-3 limes

1 cup of kalamata olives

2 roasted red peppers

salt

olive oil

This amazing little treat has over 70 g of protein, is carbohydrate and fiber-rich, and ensures a healthy amount of Vitamin C! Enjoy it. Very filling and delicious.

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Beauty, Carbohydrates, carotene, Fats, fiber, Health, potassium, Science-based nutrition, sixpence recipes, Uncategorized, Vitamin A, vitamin C, Well being

What’s for dinner?

Tonight I feast on iron, beta-carotene, Niacin, Vitamins A, B5, B6, B9, C, E, K, calcium, phosphorus, potassium, lycopene–a phytochemical (and a carotenoid pigment), and essential nutrient, and an antioxidant (just like the also available through peppers to me tonight p-coumaric acid), plant fats, and of course fiber and carbohydrates. Fantastic anti-carcinogenic properties, and a perfect recovery meal after running, weight lifting, and a morning hike.

I used:

1 green bell pepper

1/3 cup red onion, chopped

1 1/5 tbsp of garlic, minced

3 cups of kale

3 cups of spinach

1 large tomato

1/2 squash

1 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

sea salt

Once again: nothing to it–chop up the veggies, place them in a pan with a tiny bit of olive oil, and let them simmer for 15-20 minutes. Such a flavorful and wholesomely nutritious dinner. Enjoy!

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Beauty, Desserts, fiber, Health, potassium, Raw, triptophan, Uncategorized, Well being

Cucumber Banana Sorbet with coconut

My lovely neighbor created her own improvised garden. She is growing squash, pumpkins, amazingly yummy cherry tomatoes, basil, and cucumbers. Well, lots of cucumbers–not only did the plant flourish–it produced over 5 times the projected number of cucumbers, and is still going. Long story short, after my friend was tired of making pickles, cucumber salads, cucumber water, cucumber ice cream, cucumber…….she gave some of the delicious, all natural goodness away to me. In fact, I now have tons of it. And aside from the usual salads, I made myself a very simple, easy to prepare summer treat, which also turned out to be fun and delicious: cucumber banana sorbet.

There’s nothing to it, really. I pureed 4 cucumbers with 1 banana, a little bit of cocoa, a tiny bit of simple syrup (really no more than a spoonful), and sprinkled some coconut just because I love the flavor. Froze the puree for about 1 hour and…voila! So refreshing yummy!

Enjoy 🙂

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